The hydrogen battle, the lobbies are coming into play to guide the Green Deal

#InEnglish

The hydrogen battle, the lobbies are coming into play to guide the Green Deal
June 11, 2021

Francesca Cicculli
Carlotta Indiano
Giulio Rubino

Europe’s decarbonisation strategy, caught between its Green Deal, and the relaunch of the post-pandemic economy, seems to want to give a key role to hydrogen. Hydrogen is considered a clean fuel because its combustion releases only water or water vapor as a residue, however it is not present in nature. Before being burned, in fact, it must be produced. Hydrogen is not an energy source, it’s only an energy carrier, a “battery”, and not all the existing technologies to produce it have a low environmental impact.

Hydrogen will also need to be transported and stored, that is to say, an entire industrial chain should be set up in order to be able to implement its use – a chain that is still non-existent at the moment, or at least extremely limited. Moreover, many of the technologies needed to produce and distribute it economically are still experimental, and there is no guarantee that they can really work on a large scale.

In brief, the investment needed in this field is huge, and it is not clear whether its benefits can actually live up to its promises. But whether the benefits for the climate and for the citizens are there or not, surely there are already tens of billions of euros from the EU on the plate, enough to justify a colossal lobbying effort to guarantee them.

Green hydrogen, blue hydrogen

On May 22nd 2020, a letter signed by Choose Renewable Hydrogen – a joint initiative of the main European energy companies – arrived in the offices of Frans Timmermans, Vice-President of the European Commission, calling for investment in green hydrogen produced from renewable energy because, together with the electrification of the networks, «it is the best way to achieve full decarbonisation and climate neutrality by 2050».

EU Commissioner and vicepresident Frans Timmermans at a press conference in Brussels on July 8, 2020 – Photo: Alexandros Michailidis/Shutterstock

A month later, on June 24th, another letter reached the same office. The signatories this time are the leaders of europe’s leading oil and gas companies. Echoing the group of “electricians”, even “gas workers” see hydrogen as the key element of the energy transition, but call for investment in blue hydrogen, produced from natural gas with CO2 capture and storage. «Hydrogen produced from natural gas with carbon capture creates the conditions needed to make the market competitive», reads the letter, «Currently, the cost of hydrogen produced by gas is up to five times cheaper than the one obtained from renewables and therefore the production of blue hydrogen would also encourage a reduction in the cost of green in the long term».

The difference between the two “colours” of hydrogen is substantial: green hydrogen is in fact produced by electrolysis of water into hydrogen and oxygen, using energy produced from renewable sources. An expensive process, but completely free of climate-changing emissions.

The blue one, on the other hand, is produced from methane gas by steam reforming (SMR) process, and produces high amounts of CO2, with an added risk of methane losses along the supply chain. The capture and storage of the carbon dioxide produced (CCS) would be the only element that, according to those who promote it, could make this process “clean”, but it is a technology that presents several critical issues, as we will see.

#InEnglish

The Commission does not yet seem to have taken a clear line between these two different positions. At the present day, they are betting on green hydrogen but passing through the blue one, considering both as sustainable. At the base of the Commission’s choices, however, there is an intensive lobbying activity, which is likely to bring new funding precisely to the companies responsible for the biggest part of the emissions.

Why hydrogen?

«Hydrogen has had many lives since the 1970s», Alessandro Franco, professor of energy at the University of Pisa, explains to IrpiMedia. «After the 2008 crisis, it was planned to use hydrogen in the automotive/transport sector, then supplanted by hybrid and electric mobility. Now green hydrogen is the new trend, produced from renewable sources», continues Alessandro Franco who adds: «I do not know if it will be an important element in the energy transition, despite its positive characteristics».

Hydrogen production is a field in which many different actors have research interests and this, according to Professor Franco, is why it attracts diverse kinds of industries. «Compared to the past, this time traditional industries – the oil industries – are also aiming for hydrogen, because clearly there has been a crisis in the sector that pushes for diversification and a search for new markets».

But, according to others, the focus on hydrogen is mainly the result of economic strategies: «The coal industry is already dead, the gas industry is a walking dead», says Davide Sabbadin of the European Environmental Bureau (EEB), an association that brings together europe’s leading environmental NGOs. «They know well that the European Commission has to eliminate gas by 2050 because it is not compatible with the scenario of a decarbonised Europe. They are therefore using blue hydrogen as a lifeline».

«The coal industry is already dead, the gas industry is a walking dead. They are therefore using blue hydrogen as a lifeline»

Davide Sabbadin, European Environmental Bureau

Environmental associations are quite wary of blue hydrogen, and they are suspicious of the European Commission’s idea of welcoming it into its environmental strategy. The main criticalities, as anticipated, concern the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology, which foresees using depleted oil wells to store it. This technology, which is still in the prototype phase, still leaves a significant percentage of emissions into the air and is extremely expensive. Moreover, the transport of captured carbon dioxide requires a network of ducts, which does not currently exist, capable of supporting its extent. Currently, there are no active CCS facilities, nor are there any infrastructures that would allow CO2 to be transported. Therefore, producing blue hydrogen is practically still impossible.

The European Union is already aware of the inefficiency of CCS: between 2008 and 2017 the UE financed €424 million for six failed CCS projects – with the exception of one that did not meet the expectations anyway – and for this reason it was criticised by the European Court of Auditors.

Another critique to CCS concerns one of its main applications: carbon dioxide would be pumped into old oil wells to recover hard to extract oil, with additional economic benefits for the oil industries and an increase in fossil fuels availability.

The collapse of the American CCS

The Petra Nova plant in Texas, USA is the demonstration that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently economically unsustainable. The plant – opened in 2016 and funded with $195 million by the Trump Administration – was officially closed at the beginning of 2021 because it was too expensive.

The world’s largest CCS plant was designed to capture CO2 emissions from the WA Parish coal-fired power plant, and then transport them by pipeline to a nearby oil field. There, carbon dioxide was injected into wells that had already exceeded their peak of exploitation, thus allowing the remaining oil to be extracted. But extracting oil with this method has become increasingly expensive, also due to the collapse in the price of crude oil during the pandemic. CCS also required so much energy that the plant was forced to rely on an additional CO2 separation gas plant.

The results were far below expectations: emissions were expected to be reduced by 90%, however a study by the Environmental Projection Agency showed that Petra Nova captured only 7% of them and that in three years the plant was closed for 367 days due to problems with the technology. The same report indicated that CCS caused a significant increase in water consumption at the WA Parish coal-fired power plant.

How blue hydrogen was adopted in the European energy strategy

On September 11th 2019, a new entity was recorded in the European Commission’s transparency register – the database listing organisations seeking to influence the legislative and policy implementation process of the European institutions, Gas for Climate.

Founded in 2017, Gas for Climate is a consortium composed of ten European gas companies, including: Enagás (Spain), Energinet (Denmark), Fluxys (Belgium), Gasunie (Netherlands), GRTgaz and Teréga (France), ONTRAS and Open Grid Europe (Germany), Snam (Italy), Swedegas (Sweden), DESFA (Greece); plus two biogas industries, the Italian Biogas Consortium and the European Biogas Association. The group shares the belief that gas and its infrastructure have a key role in the European decarbonisation process.

On December 11th 2019, the European Green Deal – the strategy that should make Europe to be the first carbon-neutral continent – was presented and Gas for Climate’s companies realise that there is little space left for gas: Europe wants to aim at hydrogen as the key element of energy transition. However, the European Green Deal remains vague on how hydrogen should be produced, generically talking about “clean hydrogen”. Therefore gas companies tried to avoid blue hydrogen to be excluded from European industrial strategy and to prevent the shrinkage of the gas market.

Gas for Climate, together with different European energy companies, was convoked by the Commission when the meetings to establish the European industrial strategy started. These meetings were so successful that on March 10th 2020, along with the industrial strategy, the Commission set up the European Hydrogen Alliance, bringing together stakeholders, governmental , institutional and industrial partners. The activities defined a transitional phase in which blu hydrogen will be produced. «We fought to be heard as an NGO but we obviously played a secondary role», Davide Sabbadin said.

As stated in the Re:Common report La montatura dell’idrogeno (The Hydrogen Hoax), environmental NGOs had only 37 meetings with EU officials as opposed to the 163 that the European Hydrogen Alliance had.

Gas for Climate doesn’t appear amongst the official members of the Hydrogen Alliance, but its members do. Among other protagonists we find Hydrogen Europe, an association that includes more than one hundred industrial companies and Members of the European Parliament, working together to promote hydrogen.

Hydrogen Europe represents the interests of companies and research centres within a partnership both public and private with the EU Commision, the Hydrogen Joint Undertaking. As claimed by Re:Common, Hydrogen Europe is merely «a Commission’s creature that on behalf of all industries, does lobby on the Commission itself». Between May and June 2020, the suggestions that companies gave to the Commission were published, including the ones that came from Gas for Climate.

Companies claim that the current EU infrastructures aren’t able to satisfy the growing demand for hydrogen if they decide to produce only the green one. According to companies, it would be necessary in the medium term to use blue hydrogen and further invest in gas. For this reason, companies also consider it necessary to conclude alliances with Eastern Europe countries for the supply of gas and with North African countries that already have the infrastructures to transport it.

The fact that to produce green hydrogen we need to pass through blue hydrogen is a statement yet to be economically proven. According to some independent studies, including the report of the International Renewable Energy Agency, hydrogen produced from renewable electricity might compete economically with hydrogen produced from fossil sources by 2030. The increase in production of renewable energies would allow green hydrogen to become a cheap solution in the short term. «The strategies proposed may lower the production cost of green hydrogen by 40%in the short term and by 80% in the long run, making the price of the green one fall below $2 per kg, if different States decide to lower costs for electrolyzers» shows the report.

The trick to keep selling gas

The hydrogen strategy was presented officially on July 8th 2020 by the EU Commission. Besides confirming the desire to produce blue hydrogen, the Commission also announced that Hydrogen Alliance will help to plan the hydrogen infrastructures.

Gas for Climate didn’t miss this opportunity: on July 17th 2020 it signes the European Hydrogen Backbone Report that focuses exactly on hydrogen infrastructures. The consortium imagines a hydrogen network – 23.000 km to be achieved by 2040 – that will connect the future centres of supply and demand for hydrogen throughout Europe.

The crucial point of the project, according to its supporters, is that 75% of the network will be made out of retrofitted gas pipelines. The idea is to reconvert and remodel the existing gas pipelines to allow them to transport also hydrogen together with methane gas that, in the coming years, will be used less and less. The cost for this network is estimated between 27 and 64 billion euros.

The companies that signed the report, like the italian Snam, have been testing for years the transport of hydrogen inside gas pipes via blending – mixing hydrogen and methane together. Thanks to this solution, it’s possible to transport up to a maximum of 20% hydrogen blended with 80% methane. As companies themselves claim, if the hydrogen goes beyond this percentage would require tailored pipes.

«When they talk about selling 20% of hydrogen, in fact, they aim at selling 80% of gas – claims Davide Sabbadin -. Money is spent on infrastructures that will be white elephants, because in ten years time this 80% gas will no longer be sold to anyone if we look at the EU climate goals that cut down the consumption of gas. So that’s how hydrogen is an excuse to do some tweaking and keep on selling us methane».

The future of hydrogen

For the post-pandemic recovery, the European Union has planned a complex recovery plan which foresees ample funds to be distributed to each member state. The most widely discussed in recent months has been the Next Generation EU fund, which will allocate €675.5 billion. Each Nation must now fill in its own national plan, investing 35% of the funds it will receive to achieve the goals set by the Green Deal.

Each national plan will be very different from each other. For example, Eastern European countries are more cautious about climate and see gas as transition fuel and for this reason they might direct european funds to the production of blue hydrogen.

Other countries are more interested in green hydrogen. Among these, Germany keeps on making agreements with Russia for the supply of gas, but at the same time it would have a competitive advantage in the production of green hydrogen, because the major producers of electrolyzers (the machines for water electrolysis) in Europe are German. In contrast Italy has Eni and Snam that aim at gas and Enel which is in favour of the development of renewable energies. Eventually, national plans will be a compromise between different companies.

But if we actually want to aim at the decarbonisation and the achievement of the Green Deal goals, talking about hydrogen regardless of its “colour” is likely to be a massive distraction operation.

«Without a surplus of renewable energy production to be used for hydrogen production, any speech about hydrogen is only in favour of gas companies»

Massimiliano Varriale, WWF energy consultant

Massimiliano Varriale, WWF energy consultant, helps us to do the math: «The real problem is that there’s not enough renewable energy production. Each year in Italy barely one thousand new megawatt of renewable energies are installed. Germany on photovoltaic alone installs 4/5000 megawatt per year and it’s one of the least sunny european countries. To get to the goals of decarbonisation that we set we should install 6000 or 7000 renewable energy generators per year». Actually, Varriale concludes «without a surplus of renewable energy production to be used for gas production, any speech about hydrogen is only in favour of gas companies».

As a matter of fact, the European Commision didn’t even define yet a strategy on where to use hydrogen and doesn’t even have a position on network development: «The discussion was led by those who produce pipes and logistics, but they didn’t make a decision about how to distribute hydrogen because it obviously has huge geopolitical impact» said Davide Sabbadin.

After March 27th 2021 we will obtain a clearer picture on the situation, when the European industrial strategy will be published. It will establish the maximum amount of CO2 that can be emitted by producing hydrogen. Within those limits we will refer to it as “clean hydrogen”. The higher the authorized level of emissions is, the more likely is that blue hydrogen will become part of the european strategy.

«The list of areas in which hydrogen will be used, the projects on which to invest the earliest funds, the discussions about the taxation of energy carriers and the amendment of directives about energy efficiency and renewable sources – planned for the summer 2021- will tell us if the European Union still wants to promote gas or not – concludes Davide Sabbadin -. The choices will also depend on the positions of national governments because in the end details will be defined by politics. The big choices will be made behind closed doors and in small rooms».

CREDITS

Authors

Francesca Cicculli
Carlotta Indiano
Giulio Rubino

Editing

Lorenzo Bagnoli

Photo

EU Commission headquarter in Brussels
Photo: Xavier Lejeune/Shutterstock

With the support of

Translated by

Marta Soldati
Allison Vernetti

La partita dell’idrogeno, le lobby in campo per orientare il Green Deal

#GreenWashing

La partita dell’idrogeno, le lobby in campo per orientare il Green Deal

Francesca Cicculli
Carlotta Indiano
Giulio Rubino

La strategia di decarbonizzazione dell’Europa alle prese con il suo Green Deal, ma anche con il rilancio dell’economia post-pandemia, sembra voler affidare all’idrogeno un ruolo chiave.
Considerato un combustibile pulito perché la sua combustione rilascia solo acqua o vapore acqueo come residuo, l’idrogeno però non è presente in natura. Prima di essere bruciato, infatti, va prodotto. Non è una fonte di energia ma solo un vettore energetico, una “batteria”, e non tutti i sistemi per produrlo sono a basso impatto ambientale.

L’idrogeno inoltre avrà bisogno di essere trasportato e conservato, andrebbe cioè messa in piedi un’intera filiera industriale per poterlo utilizzare, filiera che al momento è ancora inesistente, o quantomeno estremamente limitata. Oltretutto, molte delle tecnologie necessarie a produrlo e distribuirlo in maniera economicamente vantaggiosa sono ancora sperimentali, e non c’è garanzia che possano davvero funzionare su vasta scala.

In breve, gli investimenti necessari in questo settore sono enormi, e non è chiaro se i suoi benefici possano effettivamente essere all’altezza delle promesse. Ma che i vantaggi per il clima e per i cittadini ci siano o meno, sicuramente sul piatto ci sono decine di miliardi di euro di fondi provenienti dall’Ue, abbastanza da giustificare un colossale sforzo lobbistico per garantirli.

Idrogeno verde, idrogeno blu

Il 22 maggio 2020, negli uffici di Frans Timmermans, vicepresidente della Commissione europea, arriva una lettera firmata da Choose Renewable Hydrogen – un’iniziativa congiunta delle principali compagnie energetiche europee – le quali chiedono di investire sull’idrogeno verde prodotto da energie rinnovabili perché, insieme alla elettrificazione delle reti, «è la migliore strada per raggiungere la piena decarbonizzazione e la neutralità climatica entro il 2050».

IrpiMedia è gratuito

Ogni donazione è indispensabile per lo sviluppo di IrpiMedia

Frans Timmermans, vicepresidente della Commissione europea, durante una conferenza stampa a Bruxelles l’8 luglio 2020 – Foto: Alexandros Michailidis/Shutterstock

Un mese dopo, il 24 giugno, un’altra lettera raggiunge gli stessi uffici. I firmatari questa volta sono i leader delle principali compagnie europee produttrici di gas e petrolio. Facendo eco al gruppo degli “elettricisti”, anche i “gasisti” vedono nell’idrogeno l’elemento chiave della transizione energetica, ma chiedono investimenti per l’idrogeno blu, prodotto dal gas naturale con cattura e stoccaggio di CO2. «L’idrogeno prodotto dal gas naturale con cattura del carbonio crea le condizioni necessarie per rendere il mercato competitivo», si legge nella lettera, «Attualmente il costo dell’idrogeno prodotto da gas è fino a cinque volte più economico di quello ottenuto da rinnovabile e dunque la produzione di idrogeno blu favorirebbe sul lungo termine anche una riduzione del costo del verde».

La differenza fra i due “colori” dell’idrogeno è sostanziale: l’idrogeno verde è infatti prodotto scomponendo per elettrolisi l’acqua in idrogeno e ossigeno usando energia prodotta da fonti rinnovabili. Un processo costoso, ma completamente privo di emissioni climalteranti.

Quello blu invece, è prodotto a partire da gas metano tramite processo di Steam Reforming (SMR), produce elevate quantità di Co2 a cui si aggiunge rischio di perdite di metano lungo la filiera. La cattura e lo stoccaggio dell’anidride carbonica prodotta (CCS) sarebbe l’unico elemento che, a detta di chi lo promuove, potrebbe rendere “pulito” questo processo, ma si tratta di una tecnologia che presenta diverse criticità, come vedremo.

#GreenWashing

Una questione che brucia

L’industria dello scisto bituminoso in Estonia, un carburante ad alto impatto ambientale che blocca il paese baltico fra la transizione ecologica e l’eredità post-sovietica

Una chimera chiamata metano sintetico 

Le lobby del gas e dell’auto dichiarano che non siamo “pronti” a passare all’elettrico, ma che servono “carburanti di transizione”. Italgas li studia e tali prodotti appaiono ancora meno pronti dell’elettrico stesso

Il compromesso politico sulla tassonomia europea

Gas in cambio di nucleare: così la Francia e i Paesi dell’Est decidono sulla lista verde dell’Europa. La Commissione evita le consultazioni pubbliche e aggira il parere dei tecnici

La Commissione non sembra aver ancora preso una linea chiara fra queste due diverse posizioni. Ad oggi si scommette sull’idrogeno verde ma passando per quello blu, considerando entrambi come sostenibili. Alla base delle scelte della Commissione, però, c’è un’intensa attività di lobbying che rischia di portare nuovi finanziamenti proprio al settore maggiormente responsabile delle emissioni.

Perché l’idrogeno?

«L’idrogeno ha avuto molte vite a partire dagli anni ‘70», racconta a IrpiMedia Alessandro Franco, docente di energetica all’Università degli Studi di Pisa. «Dopo la crisi del 2008, si è pensato di utilizzare la mobilità a idrogeno, poi soppiantata da quella ibrida ed elettrica. Ora è di moda l’idrogeno verde, da fonti rinnovabili», continua Alessandro Franco che aggiunge: «Non so se sarà un elemento rilevante della transizione energetica, nonostante le sue caratteristiche positive».

Quella della produzione dell’idrogeno è un’area in cui molti riconoscono i propri interessi di ricerca e questo, per il professor Franco, è il motivo per cui attrae settori anche diversi tra loro. «Rispetto al passato, questa volta puntano all’idrogeno anche le industrie tradizionali, quelle petrolifere, perché evidentemente c’è stata una crisi del settore che spinge a delle diversificazioni e alla ricerca di nuovi mercati».

Ma per altri l’attenzione riservata all’idrogeno, anche da parte delle industrie del gas e del petrolio, è frutto soprattutto di strategie economiche: «L’industria del carbone è già morta, quella del gas è un morto che cammina», sostiene Davide Sabbadin dell’European Environmental Bureau (EEB), un’associazione che riunisce le principali ONG ambientaliste europee. «Sanno benissimo che la Commissione europea entro il 2050 dovrà eliminare il gas perché non compatibile con lo scenario di un’Europa decarbonizzata. Stanno dunque utilizzando l’idrogeno blu come ancora di salvezza».

«L’industria del carbone è già morta, quella del gas è un morto che cammina. Stanno dunque utilizzando l’idrogeno blu come ancora di salvezza»

Davide Sabbadin, European Environmental Bureau

L’idrogeno blu non convince le associazioni ambientaliste che guardano con sospetto l’idea della Commissione europea di accoglierlo nella sua strategia per l’ambiente. Le maggiori criticità, come anticipato, riguardano la Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) ovvero la cattura e lo stoccaggio della CO2, che verrebbe poi immagazzinata nei pozzi di petrolio esauriti. Questa tecnologia, ancora in fase di prototipo, lascia comunque una percentuale significativa di emissioni nell’aria e risulta estremamente costosa. Inoltre, il trasporto dell’anidride carbonica catturata necessita di una rete di condotti, attualmente non esistente, capace di supportarne la portata. Ad oggi, non esistono impianti attivi per la CCS, né le infrastrutture che permetterebbero di trasportare la CO2. Produrre idrogeno blu quindi è praticamente ancora impossibile.

L’Unione europea è già consapevole dell’inefficienza della CCS: tra il 2008 e il 2017 ha finanziato 424 milioni di euro per sei progetti di CCS non riusciti – a esclusione di uno che comunque non ha soddisfatto le aspettative – e per questo è stata criticata dalla Corte dei Conti europea.

Altra critica avanzata alla CCS riguarda una delle sue applicazioni principali: l’anidride carbonica verrebbe pompata in vecchi pozzi petroliferi per recuperare il petrolio difficile da estrarre, con ulteriori benefici economici per le industrie petrolifere e un incremento della disponibilità del fossile.

Il fallimento della CCS americana

La dimostrazione che la Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) sia una tecnologia al momento insostenibile economicamente è l’impianto Petra Nova situato in Texas, negli Stati Uniti. Inaugurato nel 2016 e finanziato con 195 milioni di dollari dall’Amministrazione Trump, è stato ufficialmente chiuso all’inizio del 2021 perché troppo costoso.

Il più grande impianto di CCS al mondo era pensato per catturare le emissioni di CO2 della centrale a carbone di WA Parish, per poi trasportarle via gasdotto in un vicino giacimento di petrolio. Lì, l’anidride carbonica veniva iniettata nei pozzi che avevano già superato il loro picco di sfruttamento, permettendo quindi di estrarre il petrolio rimasto. Ma estrarre petrolio con questo metodo è diventato via via più costoso, anche a causa del crollo del prezzo del greggio durante la pandemia. La CCS richiedeva inoltre così tanto impiego di energia da costringere l’impianto ad appoggiarsi a un’ulteriore centrale a gas per la separazione della CO2.

I risultati ottenuti sono stati molto al di sotto delle aspettative: era prevista una riduzione delle emissioni del 90%, ma uno studio dell’Environmental Projection Agency ha dimostrato che Petra Nova ne catturava solamente il 7% e che in tre anni l’impianto è stato chiuso per 367 giorni a causa di problemi con la tecnologia. Lo stesso rapporto ha indicato che la CCS ha causato un aumento significativo del consumo di acqua nella centrale a carbone di WA Parish.

Vuoi fare una segnalazione?

Diventa una fonte. Con IrpiLeaks puoi comunicare con noi in sicurezza

Come l’idrogeno blu è entrato nella strategia energetica europea

L’11 settembre 2019, nel registro trasparenza della Commissione europea – la banca dati che elenca le organizzazioni che cercano di influenzare il processo legislativo e di attuazione delle politiche delle istituzioni europee – viene registrata Gas for Climate.

Nato nel 2017, è un consorzio composto da dieci compagnie europee che si occupano di produzione e trasporto di gas, tra cui: Enagás (Spagna), Energinet (Danimarca), Fluxys (Belgio), Gasunie (Olanda), GRTgaz e Teréga (Francia), ONTRAS e Open Grid Europe (Germania), Snam (Italia), Swedegas (Svezia), DESFA (Grecia); più due industrie di biogas, il Consorzio Italiano Biogas e European Biogas Association. Il gruppo è unito dalla convinzione che il gas e le sue infrastrutture siano centrali nel processo di decarbonizzazione europeo.

Quando l’11 dicembre 2019 viene presentato l’European Green Deal – la strategia che dovrebbe portare l’Europa a essere il primo continente a impatto climatico zero – le aziende di Gas for Climate si rendono conto che lo spazio per il gas è poco: l’Europa vuole puntare sull’idrogeno come elemento centrale della transizione energetica. Il Green Deal, però, resta vago sulle fonti di produzione di idrogeno, parlando genericamente di “clean hydrogen”. Da qui le aziende del gas cercano di evitare che l’idrogeno blu venga escluso dalla strategia industriale europea e di impedire il restringimento del mercato del gas.

Gas for Climate, insieme alle varie industrie energetiche europee, viene convocato dalla Commissione quando iniziano gli incontri per definire la Strategia Industriale Europea. Gli incontri sono così proficui che il 10 marzo 2020, insieme alla strategia industriale, la commissione crea l’European Hydrogen Alliance, che riunisce investitori, partner governativi, istituzionali e industriali. I lavori hanno portato a definire una fase di transizione in cui si produrrà idrogeno blu. «Noi abbiamo battagliato affinché fossimo ascoltati come Ong, ma ovviamente abbiamo avuto un ruolo secondario», racconta Davide Sabbadin.

Come si legge nel report di Re:common La montatura dell’idrogeno, infatti, c’è un gap tra il numero di incontri che le Ong ambientaliste hanno avuto con i funzionari europei e quello degli altri membri dell’Alleanza, 37 incontri contro 163.

Gas for Climate non risulta tra i membri ufficiali dell’Hydrogen Alliance, ma ci sono le aziende che lo compongono. Tra gli altri protagonisti troviamo Hydrogen Europe, un’associazione che include più di cento compagnie industriali e membri del parlamento europeo, che lavorano insieme per promuovere l’idrogeno.

Hydrogen Europe rappresenta gli interessi di aziende e centri di ricerca all’interno di una partnership pubblico-privata con la Commissione europea: la Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking. Come sostiene Re:common, Hydrogen Europe è quindi «una creatura della Commissione, che per conto dell’industria fa lobby sulla creatrice stessa».

Tra maggio e giugno 2020 vengono resi pubblici i suggerimenti che le aziende hanno dato alla Commissione, compresi quelli delle aziende che fanno parte di Gas for Climate. Sostengono che le infrastrutture europee attuali non sarebbero in grado di soddisfare la crescente domanda di idrogeno qualora si pensasse di produrre solo quello verde. Per loro sarebbe quindi necessario nel medio termine passare per l’idrogeno blu e investire ancora sul gas. Per questo motivo ritengono anche necessario stringere accordi con l’Est Europa per l’accaparramento del gas e con quelli del Nord Africa che avrebbero già le infrastrutture per trasportarlo.

IrpiMedia è gratuito

Ogni donazione è indispensabile per lo sviluppo di IrpiMedia

Ma che per produrre idrogeno verde serva prima passare da quello blu è ancora economicamente da dimostrare. Secondo alcuni studi indipendenti, tra cui troviamo il report dell’International Renewable Energy Agency, l’idrogeno prodotto con elettricità rinnovabile potrebbe competere economicamente con la produzione di idrogeno da fonti fossili entro il 2030. Aumentando la produzione di energie rinnovabili, si consentirebbe all’idrogeno verde di diventare una soluzione economica nel breve periodo: «Le strategie proposte potrebbero ridurre i costi di produzione dell’idrogeno verde del 40% nel breve termine e fino all’80% nel lungo, facendo scendere il prezzo del verde al di sotto dei 2 dollari per chilogrammo, qualora gli Stati decidessero di abbattere i costi degli elettrolizzatori» si legge nel report.

Un risultato che renderebbe competitivo l’idrogeno verde già nella prossima decade se si decidesse di investire sulle rinnovabili invece che passare per il gas.

Il trucco per continuare a vendere gas

La strategia dell’idrogeno viene presentata ufficialmente l’8 luglio 2020 dalla Commissione europea. Oltre a confermare la volontà di produrre idrogeno blu, annuncia che l’Hydrogen Alliance contribuirà pianificare le infrastrutture dell’idrogeno.

Gas for Climate non si lascia sfuggire neanche questa occasione: il 17 luglio 2020 firma l’European Hydrogen Backbone Report, incentrato proprio sulle infrastrutture dell’idrogeno. Il consorzio immagina una rete di idrogenodotti – 23.000 chilometri da realizzare entro il 2040 – che collegherà i futuri centri di domanda e offerta di idrogeno in tutta Europa.

Il punto forte del progetto, secondo gli operatori, è che il 75% della rete sarà costituito da gasdotti riadattati: l’idea è quella di riconvertire e rimodernare i gasdotti già presenti per permettergli di trasportare idrogeno e non più il gas, che nei prossimi anni sarà sempre meno utilizzato. Il costo della rete dovrebbe oscillare tra i 27 e i 64 miliardi di euro.

Le aziende firmatarie del report, come l’italiana Snam, da anni testano il passaggio dell’idrogeno all’interno delle tubature del gas tramite blending, ovvero mescolamento di idrogeno e metano. Con questa soluzione, si può trasportare fino a un massimo del 20% di idrogeno miscelato con l’80% di metano. Oltre questa percentuale, come le aziende stesse sostengono, l’idrogeno richiederebbe delle condotte ad hoc. «Quando parlano di vendita del 20% di idrogeno, in realtà, puntano a vendere 80% del gas – sostiene Davide Sabbadin -.Si spendono soldi in infrastrutture che saranno cattedrali nel deserto, perché tra dieci anni questo 80% di gas non lo vendi più a nessuno guardando agli obiettivi climatici dell’Ue, che tagliano i consumi del gas. Quindi ecco che l’idrogeno diventa la scusa per fare qualche piccolo ritocco e continuare a venderci metano».

Il futuro dell’idrogeno

Per la ripresa dopo la pandemia, l’Unione europea ha previsto un piano di fondi economici da distribuire ai singoli Stati. Quello più discusso negli ultimi mesi è stato il Next Generation Eu, che stanzia 675,5 miliardi di euro. Ogni Paese ora dovrà compilare il proprio piano nazionale, investendo il 35% dei finanziamenti che riceverà per raggiungere gli obiettivi stabiliti dal Green Deal.

I piani nazionali saranno tra loro molto diversi. I Paesi dell’est Europa, per esempio, sono molto più cauti sul piano climatico e vedono il gas come combustibile di transizione, per questo potrebbero indirizzare i fondi europei verso la filiera dell’idrogeno blu.

Altri Paesi guardano più all’idrogeno verde. Tra questi la Germania, che continua a stringere accordi con la Russia per l’approvvigionamento di gas, ma allo stesso tempo avrebbe un vantaggio competitivo nella produzione di idrogeno verde, perché i più grandi produttori di elettrolizzatori (i macchinari per l’elettrolisi dell’acqua) europei sono tedeschi. L’Italia invece ha Eni e Snam che puntano sul gas, ed Enel che è a favore dello sviluppo delle rinnovabili. Alla fine i modelli nazionali saranno un compromesso tra le posizioni delle diverse aziende.

Ma se volessimo veramente puntare alla decarbonizzazione e alla realizzazione degli obiettivi del Green Deal, parlare di idrogeno, a prescindere dal suo “colore”, rischia di essere solo una gigantesca operazione di distrazione.

«Senza un surplus di produzione di energia rinnovabile da utilizzare per produrre idrogeno, qualsiasi discorso sull’idrogeno va solo a vantaggio dell’industria del gas»

Massimiliano Varriale, consulente energetico WWF

Massimiliano Varriale, consulente energetico del WWF, ci aiuta a fare due conti: «Il vero problema – spiega- è che non abbiamo abbastanza produzione di energia rinnovabile. Ogni anno in Italia si installano appena mille megawatt di nuove rinnovabili. La Germania solo di fotovoltaico installa 4/5000 megawatt all’anno, ed è uno dei Paesi meno soleggiati d’Europa. Per arrivare in linea con gli obiettivi di decarbonizzazione che ci siamo dati dovremmo installarne 6000, 7000 all’anno». Di fatto, conclude Varriale, «senza un surplus di produzione di energia rinnovabile da utilizzare per produrre idrogeno, qualsiasi discorso sull’idrogeno va solo a vantaggio dell’industria del gas».

La Commissione europea, infatti, non ha neppure definito una strategia sui settori di utilizzo dell’idrogeno e non ha una posizione neanche sullo sviluppo della sua rete: «La discussione è stata orientata da chi fa i tubi, dalla logistica, ma non è stata presa una decisione su come distribuire l’idrogeno, perché ovviamente ha degli impatti geopolitici importantissimi», continua Davide Sabbadin.

Una linea più chiara sarà resa nota dopo il 18 marzo 2021, quando è prevista la pubblicazione della Strategia industriale europea. All’interno del documento si stabilirà la quantità massima di CO2 che si può emettere producendo idrogeno. Entro quei limiti, si potrà parlare di idrogeno pulito. Più sarà alto il numero di emissioni consentite più è probabile che nella strategia europea entri l’idrogeno blu.

«La lista dei settori in cui utilizzare l’idrogeno, i progetti su cui investire i primi fondi, le discussioni sulla tassazione dei vettori energetici e la modifica delle direttive sull’efficienza energetica e sulle rinnovabili – previste per l’estate 2021 – ci diranno se l’Unione europea vuole ancora favorire il gas o meno -, conclude Davide Sabbadin – . Le scelte dipenderanno anche da quanto si metteranno di traverso i governi nazionali perché i dettagli li definisce la politica. La differenza la si farà a porte chiuse nelle piccole stanze».

CREDITI

Autori

Francesca Cicculli
Carlotta Indiano
Giulio Rubino

Editing

Lorenzo Bagnoli

Foto

La sede della Commissione europea a Bruxelles
Foto: Xavier Lejeune/Shutterstock

Con il supporto di

Il green deal bulgaro tra oligarchi, frodi e operai sfruttati

#GreenWashing

Il green deal bulgaro tra oligarchi, frodi e operai sfruttati

La centrale di carbone di Bobov Dol. Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

Daniela Sala
Eleonora Vio

«Quando a scuola ci chiedevano di dipingere, disegnavo sempre casa mia sovrastata dall’impianto termoelettrico». Georgi Stefanov, sessantaduenne dall’aria scarmigliata, gli occhi malinconici e un sorriso stanco ma mai forzato, scosta le tende al primo piano della casa di famiglia, dove vive e dove all’epoca sedeva a fare i compiti, mentre i genitori lavoravano nelle miniere poco distanti. Oltre gli alberi da frutto e le file di ortaggi di cui Stefanov si prende cura ossessivamente durante il giorno, l’orizzonte è una linea di terra dura e piatta, su cui si staglia Lei, la centrale di Bobov Dol.

«Se è vero che le sue linee geometriche rendevano il compito abbastanza facile, il motivo principale, per cui mi ostinavo a riprodurre quest’impianto, è perché era al centro della mia vita», dice Stefanov, mantenendo il tono di voce monocorde, tipico dei tanti uomini che, come lui, si sono temprati in tanti anni di socialismo e non smettono di rimpiangerlo. Stefanov è un ex minatore figlio di minatori, e uno dei 420 abitanti rimasti a Golemo Selo, un piccolo villaggio appartenente alla municipalità di Bobov Dol, il cui destino è indissolubilmente intrecciato a quello dell’impianto a carbone più grande del sud-ovest del Paese.

L’attività mineraria in Bulgaria è cominciata nel 1891 nella lingua di terra che da Pernik, città a una trentina di chilometri da Sofia, si estende fino a includere l’intera provincia di Kyustendil, che comprende Bobov Dol e altre sette municipalità. «Quando ci siamo trasferiti in questa casa nel 1970, era tutto un via vai di camion stracolmi di materiale edile», ricorda Stefanov. Uomini provenienti da ogni angolo del blocco sovietico furono richiamati qui per costruire tra il 1973 (anno dell’inaugurazione della prima caldaia) e il 1975 (inaugurazione della terza, e ultima, caldaia) il mega complesso termoelettrico (TPP) ancora attivo. L’unica differenza è che oggi la centrale conta cinque ciminiere per via dell’acquisizione di due nuove unità, dopo che l’impianto è stato dato in concessione all’oligarca Hristo Kovachki nel 2008.

Una foto d’archivio della centrale di Bobov Dol. L’impianto è stato inaugurato nel 1973 e ha attirato lavoratori da tutta l’Unione Sovietica.

Una foto d’archivio della centrale di Bobov Dol. L’impianto è stato inaugurato nel 1973 e ha attirato lavoratori da tutta l’Unione Sovietica.

Se già allora un Paese marginale sotto ogni punto di vista cominciava ad assicurarsi la sua indipendenza sotto il profilo energetico, oggi il carbone costituisce il 40% del mix energetico e fornisce il 48% dell’elettricità del Paese. In parte, ciò è ancora dovuto alla regione del sud-ovest, ben rappresentata dalle miniere, dalla centrale termoelettrica di Bobov Dol e dal Distretto di Teleriscaldamento di Pernik in mano a Kovachki, il magnate bulgaro dal passato e presente misteriosi.

Indagato a più riprese per evasione fiscale e per riciclaggio di rifiuti illegali provenienti dall’Italia, Kovachki è anche il protagonista della campagna di privatizzazione del settore energetico, avvenuta nei primi anni 2000. Soprattutto, però, l’industria carbonifera bulgara dipende dal distretto di Stara Zagora, 240 km a est di Sofia, che conta diverse miniere e un vasto impianto a conduzione statale, Maritza East, oltre a numerose centrali private (tra cui la più vecchia, gestita da Kovachki stesso).

Bobov Dol, la città degli sfruttati

Camminando per la cittadina di Bobov Dol, che oggi conta non più di 4000 abitanti, non si vede nemmeno una traccia del fermento del passato, durato con alti e bassi fino all’inizio di questo secolo. Lungo il viale principale, i pochi superstiti sono accasciati su panchine traballanti, o si trascinano fino a uno dei due scalcinati bar lungo la piazza principale. La gente non ha più molto da dirsi ed è affidato all’alcool l’ingrato compito di riempire il vuoto che li circonda.

«Benvenuti a Robov Dol», sbiascica qualcuno. Robov Dol significa la città degli sfruttati.

IrpiMedia ha raccolto varie testimonianze tra i residenti di questa e di altre municipalità limitrofe e in molti sembrano discordare su come e quando possa essere iniziato il tracollo economico della regione. C’è chi, soprattutto tra gli anziani ex minatori, non riesce a guardare oltre la fine del socialismo e chi, tra i trenta-quarantenni rimasti senza lavoro e senza speranze, vede nella privatizzazione dell’impianto e nella mancanza di investimenti da parte di Kovachki, l’inizio del declino.

Hristo Kovachki

«La fonte della ricchezza di Kovachki rimane un mistero», afferma il report di Greenpeace, Financial Mines, citando un documento confidenziale dell’Ambasciata statunitense in Bulgaria, fatto trapelare a giugno 2009. Grazie a canali preferenziali e a rapporti privilegiati con personaggi chiave del sistema politico e finanziario bulgaro (in primis Ivaylo Mutafchiev della First Investment Bank – FIB), «Hristo Kovachki è emerso come l’attore principale della campagna di privatizzazione del settore energetico», iniziata nel 2000 e terminata nel 2008.

Proprio alla fine del 2008, però, dopo che la procura statale ha aperto un’inchiesta fiscale nei suoi confronti, Kovachki è stato condannato per evasione e i suoi beni temporaneamente congelati, per essere di lì a poco spostati offshore. Quando una nuova legislazione ha limitato il ruolo di tutti gli enti che, pur operando all’interno del settore energetico bulgaro, risiedevano in paradisi fiscali all’estero, le compagnie di Kovachki sono state trasferite verso imprese di facciata con sede in Inghilterra e a Cipro. Da quel momento, il magnate ha dichiarato di volersi allontanare dal business energetico. Peccato che, in alternativa, si sia dato alla politica e che «a oggi mantenga alcune posizioni chiave, proprio lì dove stanno le miniere e le centrali termoelettriche di sua proprietà», secondo Greenpeace.

Se, continua il report, «in un certo senso, i reclami di Kovachi hanno un fondo di verità – e lui non è il proprietario formale di questo impero energetico (sulla carta le compagnie appartengono, infatti, al Consortium Energy JSC), ne è piuttosto il rappresentante e “parafulmine”». Di fatto, comunque, ad oggi il magnate controlla dodici impianti energetici, di cui più di metà a carbone.

Le ambiguità inerenti alle sue attività non si fermano qui. Anzi, proprio quest’anno il portale investigativo bulgaro Bivol ha rivelato la fitta trama di riciclaggio di rifiuti illegali tra Italia – dove a essere coinvolte sono ‘ndrangheta e Camorra – Romania e Bulgaria, rappresentata proprio da Kovachki e dal suo esteso complesso minerario. La foga dell’oligarca nel lanciarsi in nuovi progetti energetici sembrerebbe legarsi ad alcune delle considerazioni dell’inchiesta lanciata da Greenpeace due anni fa. Secondo la stessa, «l’impero del magnate sta subendo una forte flessione, con accatastamenti di passività che ammontano a 575 milioni di euro e strutture produttive deprezzate e obsolete. La liquidazione di alcuni dei suoi asset è sul tavolo, come già si sta verificando con alcune miniere di carbone, tra cui quelle sotterranee di Bobov Dol».

Come se non bastasse, Greenpeace aveva già previsto allora «come i licenziamenti di massa dei dipendenti avrebbero causato sia la disoccupazione di intere municipalità che la dubbia riabilitazione di vecchie miniere. E come l’azienda non si sarebbe fatta scrupoli a calpestare gli interessi pubblici, nel momento in cui non fosse più riuscita a rimettersi in piedi».

Quando l’impero di Kovachki sembrava ormai spacciato, è arrivata, però, la Commissione Europea a ribaltare ancora una volta la situazione, prima con il Green Deal e poi con svariati miliardi a sostegno di progetti volti a supportare la transizione energetica. È in questo contesto che si inserisce la piattaforma Brown to Green, voluta e sponsorizzata dal braccio destro, nonché volto pubblico e più presentabile, del magnate, Kristina Lazarova.

Una cosa è certa. Il punto di non ritorno è stata la chiusura definitiva delle miniere sotterranee di carbone a dicembre 2018. «Il 98% della nostra economia dipendeva dall’estrazione di carbone, ma invece di trovare delle alternative in tempo, si è pensato bene di chiudere le miniere sotterranee da un giorno all’altro e di abbandonare duemila persone al proprio destino» afferma la sindaca Elza Velichkova, intervallando meccanicamente a ogni tiro di sigaretta un sorso di caffè. «Bobov Dol è l’esempio europeo di quello che non dev’essere fatto».

Se ai massicci tagli del personale si somma l’esodo di tutti quei giovani che sono fuggiti altrove per l’assenza di opportunità, non si fatica a capire il perché dello scenario desolante.

The (un)just transition

«Cosa distingue la nostra dalle altre regioni carbonifere d’Europa?», sbuffa la sindaca Velichkova. «Semplice. Qui la transizione dal carbone non ha avuto nulla di giusto».

A cosa si riferisce Velichkova? Per capirlo, facciamo un passo indietro.

La Bulgaria è uno dei Paesi europei a più alta intensità energetica, ovvero – secondo l’indicatore che rapporta il consumo energetico al Pil – consumerebbe 3,6 volte in più rispetto alla media europea, per convertire l’energia in prodotto interno lordo, e quindi per far funzionare i vari settori e servizi. Inoltre, emette 4,4 volte di emissioni di CO2 in più, principalmente a causa del carbone. Uno spreco energetico, questo, che si traduce in costi spropositati per lo Stato.

La situazione si è fatta particolarmente critica, da quando, con il Protocollo di Parigi, l’anidride carbonica – di cui il carbone è il principale responsabile – è stata identificata come la prima causa del riscaldamento globale e il costo delle emissioni di CO2, a carico dei Paesi e degli impianti che eccedono i limiti, è passato dai 5 euro del 2017 ai 25 euro del 2019 (e ai quasi 30 euro di dicembre 2020).

Un edificio abbandonato nei pressi della centrale di Bobov Dol.
Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

Un edificio abbandonato nei pressi della centrale di Bobov Dol. Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

«All’incirca tre anni fa, quando nessuno in Bulgaria ne parlava, ho sfidato i miei capi, dicendo che era arrivato il momento di affrontare l’elefante nella stanza», racconta Georgi Stefanov, portavoce di WWF Bulgaria, da non confondere con l’omonimo abitante di Golemo Selo. «Non c’era più tempo da perdere; dovevamo focalizzarci sul vero problema, cioè il settore carbonifero, causa dei due terzi delle emissioni di CO2 riportate annualmente nel nostro Paese».

Prendendo esempio da altri Stati, il WWF ha introdotto, primo in Bulgaria, il concetto di transizione verso forme di energia più pulita e, poi, col passare del tempo, di transizione giusta, termine cui fa riferimento anche la sindaca di Bobov Dol, che si riferisce a un cambiamento energetico positivo non solo per l’ambiente, ma anche per l’assetto sociale ed economico delle comunità interessate.

È il 2019 quando il WWF riesce ad attirare l’attenzione di alcuni interlocutori strategici; in primis, di Hristo Kovachki. Le decisioni prese dal magnate fino ad allora, a partire dalla chiusura delle miniere sotterranee a fine 2018, non possono essere ricondotte a politiche verdi ma, piuttosto, a considerazioni di natura economica, essendo diventato il carbone sempre meno redditizio.

«Dopo che Kovachki ha tagliato i suoi dipendenti per ragioni economiche – non sapremo mai di quante persone si tratti, perché lui a Bobov Dol è il dio indiscusso e nessuno osa parlargli alle spalle – siamo riusciti a convincerlo della bontà della transizione», spiega Stefanov del WWF. «Abbiamo iniziato col dirgli che se lui, proprietario di 11 impianti sparsi per il Paese, voleva mantenere un ruolo di primo piano nella produzione energetica, doveva pensare a delle alternative. La svolta è avvenuta, però, quando gli abbiamo riferito che, se si fosse convertito a fonti di energia pulite, la Commissione Europea avrebbe aperto il portafogli».

Per questo, anche il cambio di rotta successivo intrapreso da Kovachki, suggellato con la creazione della piattaforma Brown to Green, sembra avere poco o nulla a che fare con i principi etici. Piuttosto, sarebbe da ricondursi al Green Deal europeo, con l’istituzione del Just Transition Fund a gennaio 2020, e ai 1,1 miliardi di euro stanziati per la Bulgaria, previa consegna di un piano strategico nazionale, da investire nelle due regioni carbonifere di Pernik-Kyustendil e Stara Zagora.

Il complesso carbonifero di Maritza East, a Stara Zagora, conta all’incirca 12 mila dipendenti (e possibili elettori). Per questo, in zona, il Governo si fa carico dei debiti degli impianti in perdita, pur di non mettere la parola “fine” all’industria carbonifera. Ma nel sud-ovest la situazione è molto diversa. Qui l’impero di Kovachki, tra passività di centinaia di miliardi di euro e strutture produttive deprezzate e obsolete, non avrebbe retto la chiusura delle miniere sotterranee, se non fosse stato per quest’ultima allettante àncora di salvezza.

Ecco perché quella che la sindaca Velichkova definisce come transizione ingiusta è, in realtà, noncuranza del destino della propria gente. Anche in seguito è difficile scorgere in Kovachki e nella sua squadra la volontà di fare del bene alla comunità, quanto, invece, l’ennesima possibilità di arricchirsi.

Dentro l’impero dell’oligarca
All’interno della centrale di Bobov Dol, fra l’eredità degli anni 70 e gli improbabili piani di rilancio verso l’idrogeno

Una miniera di carbone esaurita di recente nei pressi della città di Pernik e chiusa all’inizio del 2020. Pernik, circondata da miniere di carbone, nel 2015 risultava essere la città più inquinata d’Europa. Pernik, Bulgaria

Daniela Sala
Eleonora Vio

L’estate scorsa, quando abbiamo scritto per la prima volta a Kristina Lazarova, a capo del direttivo della centrale di Bobov Dol dal 2017 e fondatrice dell’iniziativa Brown to Green sponsorizzata da Kovachki, non ci aspettavamo granché. Invece, è stato sorprendente ricevere di lì a poco un’email entusiasta, in cui lei stessa ci invitava a visitare il complesso. Trattandosi di un’occasione imperdibile, di lì a una settimana abbiamo noleggiato una macchina e ci siamo dirette alla centrale.

Solo dopo aver zigzagato per un po’ tra i corridoi spogli, la porta si è aperta su una stanza luminosa e ben arredata. Seduta accanto al Direttore dell’impianto Emil Hristov, c’era Lazarova, una donna giovane, dallo stile sobrio e i modi eleganti. Mantenendo i convenevoli al minimo e promettendoci una lunga chiacchierata alla fine del tour, è stata lei a invitare il capo ingegnere a mostrarci la struttura.

In una visita durata oltre un’ora, siamo state condotte dalla stanza dei macchinari, dove le turbine e i generatori degli anni ’70 di origine russa, polacca e ungherese, producono l’elettricità richiesta dalle compagnie private secondo un sistema centralizzato, fino al luogo dove vengono raccolte le ceneri del carbone impiegato. Per poi passare alla stanza dove le pepite di carbone rimbalzano sui tubi metallici, prima di essere gettate nei forni incandescenti, e a un androne umido sotterraneo, dove il carbone viene macerato. A parte il capo ingegnere, che mima istrionicamente tutti i passaggi del processo, all’interno delle sale dei macchinari non c’è nessuno.

Intercettiamo un gruppo di lavoratori dall’aria annoiata all’interno della sala di controllo, che per lo stile retrò ricorda la centrale di Chernobyl, e una manciata di altri uomini all’esterno che fumano. Ma dei 1400 addetti che dovrebbero lavorare lì, a detta del Direttore, ne intravediamo non più di quindici.

Durante la visita alla centrale non ci fanno parlare con nessun operaio, ma anche all’esterno la missione è tutt’altro che semplice. Finché un dipendente non si fa avanti qualche giorno dopo, sotto anonimato. Lo incontriamo di sera in un bar appartato.

Si fa chiamare Stoyan, ha quarant’anni e lavora alla centrale di Bobov Dol da più di venti. «Per me la centrale così com’è non può continuare a funzionare. I lavori di manutenzione sono tenuti al minimo ed è chiaro che non si pensa a lungo termine», racconta. «Bruciamo carbone di bassissima qualità, perchè quello di buona qualità veniva estratto dalle miniere sotterranee, e ciò vuole dire venire a contatto continuamente con l’anidride solforosa (SO2), che è pericolosissima».

L’area dell’impianto di Bobov Dol dove viene macinato il carbone.
Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

L’area dell’impianto di Bobov Dol dove viene macinato il carbone. Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

«Il piano per la centrale di Bobov Dol era la progressiva chiusura (tra 2008 e 2014) delle strutture dedicate alla combustione del carbone e la sostituzione con moduli a gas», riporta Greenpeace, e conferma anche il direttore dell’impianto, Emil Hristov. «Ma la privatizzazione ha alterato i piani». Mentre la European Environment Agency (EEA), l’agenzia europea per l’ambiente, nel 2011 valutava la centrale di Bobov Dol tra le trenta più inquinanti di tutta l’UE, nel 2012 sono stati applicati dei filtri, che non sembrano essere, però, sufficienti.

Stoyan rincara la dose. «I filtri sono bucati e respiriamo SO2 tutto il tempo», racconta. «Ci hanno dato delle mascherine ma, per proteggerci, servirebbero protezioni speciali, invece quelle distribuite sono le più economiche». Se qualcuno osa parlare, viene zittito. «Da quando c’è stata la privatizzazione, il numero di dirigenti è rimasto lo stesso, mentre gli operai sono stati tagliati e il numero di addetti alla sicurezza è aumentato in modo impressionante», afferma Stoyan. «Non sanno nulla del lavoro che facciamo e si divertono a minacciarci».

Gli operai sono sottoposti a varie forme di pressione. Come riporta un altro ex operaio, sempre in forma anonima, «è prassi che, in tempo di elezioni, il capo turno venga da te e ti dica per chi votare. Non possono sapere se lo fai per davvero ma… alla fine lo fai, è successo anche a me». I salari sono così bassi – si passa dai 7-800 lev (360-410 euro) per gli ultimi arrivati ai 1000 lev (515 euro) di stipendio base, fino ai 1200-1300 lev (615-665 euro), per chi ha accumulato decenni di esperienza, e ai 1500-1700 lev (770-870 euro) per i capoturno – che 50 lev (25 euro) in più per il voto combinato, non si buttano.

In tanti se ne sono andati dalla centrale negli anni, ma tanti altri sono rimasti. Questo perché, come Stoyan, non intendono trasferirsi a vivere altrove e, a Bobov Dol e dintorni, anche volendo, non troverebbero altre opportunità di lavoro. Oppure, sono prossimi alla pensione. Pur essendo al corrente dei rischi, Stoyan ha insistito per parlare con noi. «Non ho niente da perdere; questo lavoro fa schifo e se mi licenziano pazienza», commenta, prima di voltare le spalle e andarsene.

Brown to green

La visita alla centrale di Bobov Dol si è conclusa, come da programma, con l’intervista «all’economista, ambientalista e politologa» – per sua stessa definizione – Kristina Lazarova. «Nel 2017 sono stata invitata a condurre la squadra di dirigenti dell’impianto, perché i proprietari avevano deciso che volevano avviare la transizione verso combustibili più puliti e verso il biocarburante», racconta. Per poi andare più a fondo sui reali motivi di questo cambiamento: «Sebbene dal 2010 al 2020 la posizione del governo bulgaro sia rimasta inflessibile riguardo alla necessità che le centrali continuassero ad alimentarsi a carbone il più a lungo possibile, abbiamo deciso di adottare altri carburanti per via dell’alto costo delle emissioni di CO2».

Nel frattempo, a fine 2019, WWF Bulgaria aveva messo a punto tre possibili scenari, contenuti nel report Just Transition, Development Scenarios for the Coal-mining regions in south-west Bulgaria, dove prefigurava l’unico futuro possibile per il sud-ovest: un futuro verde, rispettoso delle esigenze delle comunità coinvolte. Essendo l’intera area sotto il monopolio di Kovachki, il WWF si è mosso per convincerlo a mettere in piedi una struttura che, sfruttando i fondi europei, promuovesse il cambiamento.

Cos'è il Just Transition Fund

Con circa il 40% di energia prodotta a carbone, la Bulgaria è ben oltre la media europea del 24% ed è anche uno dei Paesi con l’indotto occupazionale indiretto più alto derivato dal carbone.

Istituito nel gennaio 2020, il Just Transition Fund (JTF) è uno dei pilastri del Green Deal, la strategia fatta di nuove leggi e investimenti con cui l’Unione Europea punta ad azzerare le proprie emissioni inquinanti entro il 2050, reiterando l’impegno preso con gli Accordi di Parigi del 2015.

Il JTF mira a garantire una transizione equa per le comunità locali dipendenti dal carbone e, oltre alla sostenibilità ambientale, punta anche allo sviluppo economico e sociale. Si tratta di 17,5 miliardi di euro complessivi (7,5 dal budget europeo, più 10 dal Next Generation EU Recovery Instrument), divisi tra un minimo di 108 regioni europee, individuate dalla Commissione, in 21 Paesi.

Alla Bulgaria spetterà il 6,7% del Fondo, pari a 1,1 miliardi (di cui 505 milioni dal budget Ue e 673 dal Next Generation EU). Una cifra insufficiente, secondo il Ministero dello Sviluppo regionale e dei Lavori Pubblici, per cui la transizione impatterà direttamente 8.800 persone e ne coinvolgerà indirettamente oltre 94 mila, con un costo sociale di almeno 1,2 miliardi di lev (circa 600 milioni di euro) all’anno.

Il costo della transizione dal carbone ad altre forme di produzione energetica è stimato in 20 miliardi di euro per i prossimi dieci anni. Per questo motivo, la Bulgaria dovrebbe avere almeno 33 miliardi di euro da investire, per potersi avvicinare agli obiettivi ambientali fissati dal Green Deal.

«Il 7 aprile abbiamo lanciato Brown to Green con un duplice scopo», continua Lazarova. «Da un lato, passare dal carbone all’energia verde e, dall’altro, sviluppare la regione rispondendo ai bisogni della gente dal punto di vista occupazionale». Se i motivi di questa piccola rivoluzione sono vari, è evidente, però, come Brown to Green rappresenti, oggi, l’unico tentativo concreto, da parte bulgara, di venire incontro alle richieste europee.

Anche se il settore privato non può accedere direttamente ai sussidi del JTF, ciò non vuol dire che manchino i soldi per supportare l’iniziativa. «Questa piattaforma potrà ottenere prestiti tramite partnership private con le regioni e le municipalità interessate e, visto che sta già coinvolgendo tutti gli attori principali (tra cui Ong, sindacati e imprese), e cercando di individuare con loro i problemi e le possibili soluzioni», dice Stefanov del WWF, «non credo proprio sarà un problema».

Lazarova non fa mistero del fatto che Brown to Green sta guardando a tutte le possibili fonti di finanziamento – non solo al JTF ma anche a InvestEU e Horizon Plus –, tant’è che ha coinvolto vari esperti del mondo dell’ambiente e della finanza, tra cui il Viceministro dell’Energia, Zhecho Stankov, e la Viceministra del Ministero dello Sviluppo Regionale e dei Lavori Pubblici, Denitsa Nikolova. «Stiamo anche cercando di attirare investitori stranieri (di recente sembra abbiano stretto un accordo con il colosso tedesco Siemens, nda)», dice, «e stiamo pensando di chiedere un prestito alla Banca Mondiale».

La sala di controllo dell’impianto di Bobov Dol.
Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

La sala di controllo dell’impianto di Bobov Dol. Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

Verso l’idrogeno

In ballo ci sono tante idee, ma nulla di preciso. «Abbiamo varato diverse opzioni ma nessuna è a emissioni zero», si difende Lazarova. «L’alternativa migliore è comprare turbine nuove per produrre idrogeno, che è un carburante pulito, e utilizzare questa fonte energetica al 50%, assieme al 50% di gas naturale. Inoltre, vorremmo usare l’energia solare per produrre elettricità e sfruttare la parte non adatta alla rete energetica, per produrre dell’altro idrogeno».

Lazarova pensa in grande. «Qualora non si possa bruciare, stiamo anche pensando di immagazzinare l’idrogeno all’interno di una stazione di stoccaggio. So che suona come un concetto esotico per la Bulgaria, ma non per noi», aggiunge. Nel frattempo a settembre Brown to Green è entrata a far parte della Pure Hydrogen Alliance, istituita dalla Commissione Europea con il fine di stabilire un’agenda di investimenti e di supportare l’ampliamento della catena del valore dell’idrogeno in Europa. Un sistema industriale il cui valore è stimato attorno ai 430 miliardi di euro.

Anche se, in nome di certi obiettivi, il WWF non si esprime sulla condotta dei suoi partner, come emerge dalla posizione volutamente ambigua verso Kovachki e Brown to Green, Stefanov negli ultimi mesi si è fatto più cauto. «Come per la combustione dei rifiuti illegali all’interno delle ex miniere sotterranee, che dicono sia stata interrotta, ma non ne abbiamo la certezza, vogliamo procedere con cautela anche con i piani verdi. Non crediamo, finché non vediamo».

Di certo l’iniziativa sta raccogliendo grande supporto, come dimostrano le lettere d’interesse firmate dai sindacati, dalle imprese coinvolte nel settore energetico e dai Ministeri dell’Energia e dello Sviluppo Regionale. Se, pubblicamente, i rapporti tra Kovachki e le istituzioni non sono dei migliori, proprio per via dei ripetuti scandali di cui si è macchiato l’oligarca, da qualche mese sembra esserci una certa cooperazione tra i due proprio nell’ambito di questa piattaforma.

Se tanto ci dà tanto, senza rinunciare alle proprie partite personali, nessuno vuole perdere la sua grande occasione di mettere le mani sull’invitante torta europea.

La truffa milionaria sulle emissioni

Le ipotesi di finanziamenti europei fanno gola agli oligarchi del Paese, che si preparano a spenderli secondo un piano di sviluppo tenuto segreto alla popolazione

Georgi Stefanov (65) nel giardino di casa. Il padre aveva partecipato alla costruzione della centrale negli anni ’70. Da allora vive qui, a pochi passi dalla centrale stessa. Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

Daniela Sala
Eleonora Vio

Stefanov sembra aver ragione a non volersi sbilanciare troppo in favore di Kovachki. Dopo il taglio dei dipendenti, visto che i conti ancora non tornavano, l’oligarca ha trovato, infatti, un altro modo per fare cassa.Ogni impianto che  emette CO2 deve presentare ogni anno alla Executive Environment Agency (EEA), ovvero un istituto appartenente al Ministero dell’Ambiente bulgaro, un report in cui documenta le tonnellate di anidride carbonica prodotte. Per ognuno di essi sono registrate la quantità di combustibile utilizzato, il valore calorifico netto per ogni specifico combustibile e il fattore di emissione usato per calcolare, per l’appunto, le tonnellate di CO2 prodotte.

Si tratta di dati pubblici e, analizzandoli, emerge come per gli impianti gestiti da Kovachki ci sia qualcosa che non torni. Ce ne dà conferma Peter Seizov, esperto di sostenibilità ambientale che da anni, come consulente, si occupa di analizzare questi report e di calcolare la media nazionale del fattore di emissione della lignite.

Quando Seizov apre il foglio di calcolo relativo alla centrale di Bobov Dol, risaltano immediatamente alcuni riquadri rossi. Nel 2018 e 2019, nonostante l’impianto continuasse a usare la stessa lignite di bassa qualità, il valore del fattore di emissione è inspiegabilmente variato, precipitando da 102 a 72,19. «I valori in rosso non li ritengo verosimili e li escludo dal calcolo della media nazionale. Come consulente, il mio compito è assicurarmi che i dati a livello nazionale siano affidabili», spiega. Per Hristo Kovachki, proprietario dell’impianto, manipolare il fattore di emissione si traduce in un risparmio diretto sul costo delle quote di emissioni, pari – solo nel 2019 – a oltre 9 milioni di euro.

IrpiMedia è gratuito

Ogni donazione è indispensabile per lo sviluppo di IrpiMedia

La truffa sulle emissioni di CO2

Introdotto nel 2005, il Sistema per lo scambio delle quote di emissione (conosciuto con l’acronimo inglese ETS, Emissions Trading Scheme) è il primo strumento concreto di applicazione del Protocollo di Kyoto e obbliga le aziende che producono energia elettrica e termica, come pure i settori industriali ad alta intensità energetica, a rendicontare l’ammontare di CO2 emessa annualmente.

Ogni azienda è tenuta ad acquistare un numero di quote, pari alle tonnellate di CO2 emessa, all’interno di un mercato borsistico comune, dove le emissioni hanno un prezzo variabile. Recentemente il sistema è stato riformato e dal minimo storico dei circa 5 euro a quota del 2017, il prezzo si è assestato tra i 25 e i 30 euro, diventando una significativa leva di contenimento del cambiamento climatico. Successivamente i dati delle singole aziende sono aggregati a livello nazionale: ogni Paese deve infatti attenersi entro i limiti fissati a livello europeo.

Come si calcolano le emissioni?

A differenza dei gas inquinanti, le emissioni di CO2 non vengono misurate, ma stimate attraverso un calcolo matematico che tiene conto, per gli impianti termoelettrici, di tre parametri fondamentali: la quantità di combustibile bruciato, il valore calorifico (ossia la quantità di energia prodotta per chilo di combustibile usato) e uno specifico fattore di emissione (che corrisponde alle tonnellate di CO2 prodotte per ogni tonnellata di combustibile bruciato).

Mentre i piccoli produttori usano valori standard di riferimento, i grandi impianti, come TPP Bobov Dol, hanno diritto a calcolare un proprio valore col supporto di un laboratorio accreditato o del proprio laboratorio interno.

Anche se la nostra ricerca si è dovuta fermare qui, poiché le nostre ripetute richieste di chiarimenti non hanno portato a nulla, è bene tenere presente che ogni report annuale sulle emissioni, prima di essere ufficialmente presentato e reso pubblico dall’EEA, dev’essere approvato da un verificatore autorizzato, scelto dall’operatore dell’impianto.

Le agenzie bulgare accreditate sono tre: SGS, Green and Fair e GMI verifier. La terza è operativa da solo due anni, cioè da quando ha sostituito Green and Fair nella verifica dei report degli impianti del suo unico cliente, il magnate Kovachki. Magari è solo una coincidenza, ma è proprio da allora che i valori delle emissioni della centrale di Bobov Dol – e delle altre appartenenti all’oligarca – sono incredibilmente mutati.

Il sindaco di Golemo Selo, Vasil Vasev, mostra i valori raccolti dall’autorità ambientale e quelli di diossina, particolarmente elevati. La cittadina di Golemo Selo si trova a poche centinaia di metri dalla centrale a carbone di Bobov Dol.
Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

Il sindaco di Golemo Selo, Vasil Vasev, mostra i valori raccolti dall’autorità ambientale e quelli di diossina, particolarmente elevati. La cittadina di Golemo Selo si trova a poche centinaia di metri dalla centrale a carbone di Bobov Dol. Golemo Selo, Bulgaria

Il misterioso piano strategico nazionale

Tornando al Just Transition Fund, per accedere agli 1,1 miliardi di euro (pari a 6,7% del totale, di cui 505 milioni derivanti dal budget Ue e 673 dal Next Generation EU) stanziati dalla Commissione, la Bulgaria deve presentare un piano strategico nazionale che affianchi alla sostenibilità ambientale, occupazione e fine della povertà per tutti.

Di questo piano sembrano essere tutti all’oscuro a parte gli ideatori e IrpiMedia, che l’ha ottenuto grazie a una fonte anonima.

Sebbene il piano debba essere sviluppato in stretta cooperazione con le realtà territoriali interessate – cioè quella di Pernik-Kyustendil e di Stara Zagora –, la sindaca di Bobov Dol, le Ong ambientaliste e i sindacati non solo non sono stati invitati al tavolo di discussione, ma non ne hanno ancora visto una copia.

«Quando (a luglio 2020) è emerso che i soldi stanziati dalla Commissione sarebbero stati il doppio di quelli proposti inizialmente, il governo ha cominciato a capirne il potenziale e a cambiare prospettiva su come potessero essere investiti a Stara Zagora», dichiara Stefanov del WWF. «Di lì a poco è cominciato un vero e proprio testa a testa con il sud-ovest».

Per poter contare sulla massima riservatezza, il governo si è avvalso di una task force ristretta, di cui fanno parte solo il vice Primo ministro, Tomislav Donchev, il viceministro dell’Energia, Zecho Stankov, e la viceministra delle Sviluppo regionale, Denitsa Nikolova. Sia Nikolova che Stankov hanno declinato ripetute richieste di intervista da parte di IrpiMedia.

Nonostante il JTF abbia implicazioni di tipo ambientale, economico e sociale, la questione sembra avere, infatti, prima di tutto forti risvolti politici e, per questo, si è deciso di confinarla, almeno per il momento, al solo tavolo dei ministri.

Il dato forse più importante che emerge dalla bozza, e che preoccupa gli addetti ai lavori della regione di Stara Zagora, è il tentativo di estendere i fondi a più aree di quelle previste dalla Commissione. La motivazione sarebbe che «la transizione avrà un impatto non solo regionale ma, imponendo una trasformazione dell’intera economia del Paese, anche nazionale».

Alle tre province di Stara Zagora, Kyustendil e Pernik andrebbero aggiunte non solo Haskovo, Yambol and Sliven, già implicitamente incluse in quanto ospitanti il 25% della forza lavoro impiegata nel complesso di Maritsa East, ma anche Varna, Haskovo, Pernik, Burgas, Lovech and Targovishte, visto che uno degli indicatori per l’allocazione dei fondi è l’intensità delle emissioni di gas serra, e tutte queste province sforano il limite.

Già così si arriva a un totale parziale di 12 province. Ma non è tutto. Nella bozza si propone di includerne altre 7, identificate come zone ad alta intensità industriale. Eppure, è una precisa richiesta della Commissione europea che i fondi del JTF siano usati solo nelle aree direttamente colpite dalla dismissione del carbone, cioè le due menzionate più volte, visto che per le regioni limitrofe è previsto l’accesso ad altri fondi europei.

«Una della scuse che abbiamo sentito più spesso», afferma Rumyana Grozeva, dirigente dell’Agenzia regionale per lo sviluppo economico di Stara Zagora (SZEDA), «è che 1,1 miliardi di euro sarebbero troppi per solo tre o sei province, ma non è vero. Abbiamo davvero bisogno che gli investimenti siano concentrati qui, dove l’impatto derivante dalla chiusura delle miniere e delle centrali sarà più severo, e temiamo che, invece, finiscano per essere dispersi».

I fondi europei fanno indubbiamente gola al governo bulgaro. Che, da un lato, tenendo i piedi in più scarpe, punta a non scontentare gli elettori in vista delle consultazioni politiche del 2021; e, dall’altro, fa il gioco della ristretta cerchia elitaria che gli sta intorno, ma anche di coloro cui dice di volersi opporre.

A spiegare bene le ambiguità dietro il Just Transition Fund è un avversario politico del Presidente Boyko Borissov, ovvero il leader della Coalizione Verde in lizza alle prossime presidenziali, Vladislav Panev. «Il JTF rappresenta una bella opportunità, perché si tratta – pur sempre – di investimenti da miliardi di euro», afferma Panev, «ma è anche una minaccia, perché è facile che questi soldi siano usati malamente e finiscano solo nelle tasche degli oligarchi, minando una sana competizione».

«Se i fondi Ue dovessero arricchire solo poche persone», conclude Panev, amaramente, «penso semplicemente che sarebbe meglio non riceverli».

Sfoglia la Galleria

CREDITI

Autori

Daniela Sala
Eleonora Vio

Foto

Daniela Sala

Riprese & montaggio

Daniela Sala

Mappe

Lorenzo Bodrero

Editing

Giulio Rubino

Con il sostegno di

I volti della transizione energetica

I volti della transizione energetica

#GreenWashing

Se ci sia luce in fondo al tunnel della pandemia non è ancora chiaro. Un anno dopo l’inizio della peggiore crisi sociale ed economica dei nostri tempi, l’idea di “recovery” e ricostruzione resta tuttora tanto vaga quanto urgente. Ma rispetto alla precedente crisi economica, dalla cui terribile gestione non ci siamo mai veramente ripresi, questa volta l’Europa, pur non senza incertezze e difficoltà, ha messo in campo uno sforzo economico senza precedenti, potenzialmente in grado non solo di rilanciare l’economia del continente, ma di dar nuova vita al suo progetto politico e alla sua visione del futuro.

Concordi nell’obiettivo, ci sono però in campo agende molto diverse per quanto riguarda le priorità. Appena prima che queste priorità venissero buttate all’aria dal Covid, infatti, l’Unione Europea aveva scelto di mettere la battaglia per il clima e la decarbonizzazione in cima alla lista, presentando giusto a dicembre 2019 il suo green deal, un ampio piano di investimenti che dovrebbe provare a dare risposta al crescente problema dei cambiamenti climatici.

Con i lockdown e il conseguente tracollo delle economie europee sembrava che l’ambizioso piano sarebbe stato messo in soffitta in attesa di tempi migliori, a favore di un approccio più tradizionale al motto di «prima l’economia poi il clima».

Alla fine però l’impegno a favore di un sistema economico più verde sembra aver prevalso, e l’ambizioso Next Generation Eu fund dovrebbe, almeno su carta, continuare in larga parte il processo delineato dal Green Deal.

Ma i settori industriali che più di tutti dovrebbero trasformarsi in questo processo, in particolare quello energetico, non si sono lasciati cogliere impreparati, e da molto tempo hanno iniziato un frenetico processo di lobbying teso a rendere il cambiamento il più gattopardesco possibile.

Il messaggio è semplice: convincere tutti che il cambiamento richiede una lunga fase di “transizione” che passi sempre attraverso le vecchie strutture (fonti fossili, gas metano, ecc.), e che queste strutture necessitino anche di ulteriori investimenti per favorirne la lenta transizione a un “verde” ancora del tutto ipotetico. Il rischio concreto è che la parte del leone dei nuovi finanziamenti europei finisca nelle stesse mani di sempre, a vantaggio di progetti dagli orizzonti ristretti il cui obiettivo è molto più salvare il presente che non preparare il futuro.

IrpiMedia, assieme ad altri partner europei, ha deciso di intraprendere una serie di inchieste sui progetti di greenwashing che tenteranno di accreditarsi in tutta Europa per ricevere fondi comunitari.

Una questione che brucia

Una questione che brucia

L’industria dello scisto bituminoso in Estonia, un carburante ad alto impatto ambientale che blocca il paese baltico fra la transizione ecologica e l’eredità post-sovietica

IrpiMedia è gratuito

Ogni donazione è indispensabile per lo sviluppo di IrpiMedia

Una chimera chiamata metano sintetico 

Una chimera chiamata metano sintetico 

Le lobby del gas e dell’auto dichiarano che non siamo “pronti” a passare all’elettrico, ma che servono “carburanti di transizione”. Italgas li studia e tali prodotti appaiono ancora meno pronti dell’elettrico stesso

Il compromesso politico sulla tassonomia europea

Il compromesso politico sulla tassonomia europea

Gas in cambio di nucleare: così la Francia e i Paesi dell’Est decidono sulla lista verde dell’Europa. La Commissione evita le consultazioni pubbliche e aggira il parere dei tecnici

Le lobby agroalimentari contro la Farm to Fork

Le lobby agroalimentari contro la Farm to Fork

Il Parlamento Ue ha approvato il testo della strategia per un settore agroalimentare più sostenibile. Ma le lobby sono al lavoro per ammorbidirne gli obiettivi, dopo aver già modificato la Politica Agricola Comune

Estremadura, terra di sacrificio

Estremadura, terra di sacrificio

La transizione ecologica, idea trainante per il Recovery Plan europeo, assieme alle opportunità di rinnovamento porta con sé anche grandi rischi di greenwashing, soprattutto per quelle regioni ricche di risorse chiave per questo processo

L’isola pioniera dell’industria estrattiva del futuro

L’isola pioniera dell’industria estrattiva del futuro

Nauru, nel Pacifico, è capofila tra le nazioni che vogliono estrarre metalli dai fondali oceanici. Diverse voci critiche, però, mettono in dubbio i vantaggi di quest’industria nella lotta ai cambiamenti climatici

Tirreno Power, processo al carbone

Tirreno Power, processo al carbone

L’azienda è a processo per disastro ambientale e sanitario nel savonese. Dieci anni fa proponeva versioni “green” e tecnologiche di gas e carbone per combattere i cambiamenti climatici

Vuoi fare una segnalazione?

Diventa una fonte. Con IrpiLeaks puoi comunicare con noi in sicurezza

Pnrr, tre versioni per un piano poco trasparente

Pnrr, tre versioni per un piano poco trasparente

Il piano di ripresa è stato pubblicato dal Governo senza allegati. La traduzione inglese si discosta da quella italiana per voci di spesa traghettate da una “missione” all’altra. Alla fine a guadagnarci è sempre l’industria del gas

La nuova corsa all’oro dell’industria estrattiva

La nuova corsa all’oro dell’industria estrattiva

È il deep sea mining: minare materiali chiave per l’industria high tech dai fondali marini. L’industria la considera un ponte verso la transizione energetica, la comunità scientifica avverte riguardo alle conseguenze

CREDITI

Autori

Raffaele Angius
Francesca Ciculli
Matteo Civillini
Sara Farolfi
Carlotta Indiano
Alessandro Leone
Piero Loi
Simone Manda
Daniela Sala
Eleonora Vio

Riprese & montaggio

Daniela Sala

Foto

Daniela Sala

Editing

Lorenzo Bagnoli
Luca Rinaldi
Giulio Rubino

Infografiche & Mappe

Lorenzo Bodrero

Foto di copertina

Con il supporto di